Louisa Tounsia – Heukm Ennessouane – Pathé, c. 1930-1931 - During Louisa Tounsia’s rise to stardom in the mid-to-late 1920s, the Tunis-born Jewish artist played an instrumental role in carving out a modern Tunisian public.
Flifla Chamia – Moute Habiba Messika – Gramophone, c. 1930 - There was near-consensus during the interwar period that Flifla Chamia was the greatest dancer of her generation.
Albert Suissa – Ghoniet Lefrak – Olympia, c. 1950s - That Albert Suissa’s biography and history have until now escaped is not surprising. In many ways, he lived in-between and embodied the painful essence of “lefrak” (“separation”).
Reinette l’Oranaise – Ya biadi ya nas – Polyphon, c. 1934 - If you listen carefully to the first thirty-seconds of Reinette’s recording of “Ya biadi ya nas,” Saoud himself is there in the background, lending his vocals to hers as she warms up.
Slomo Souiri – Kssidat Farha – Olympia, c. 1950s - In the 1930s, he added Baidaphon and Columbia to his roster. As for the latter, the label claimed that the public “could not remain indifferent” to Souiri’s popular repertoire
Salim Halali – Je t’appartiens (tango) – Pathe, c. 1945 - With this tango, then, Salim Halali not only boldly announced his return to the stage and studio but also made it clear that, once again, he belonged to his public.